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Tasty tidbits from the past. Mostly images, but hopefully all food for thought. A definite 19th century focus, but I try to keep an open mind.

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beatonna:

Well now who among us would not enjoy the 1811 Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue?

 A
          DICTIONARY
             OF
BUCKISH SLANG, UNIVERSITY WIT,
            AND
     PICKPOCKET ELOQUENCE.

beatonna:

Well now who among us would not enjoy the 1811 Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue?

 A
          DICTIONARY
             OF
BUCKISH SLANG, UNIVERSITY WIT,
            AND
     PICKPOCKET ELOQUENCE.

(via beatonna)
fripperiesandfobs:

Wedding ensemble, 1780
From the Chertsey Museum via Vogue Paris

fripperiesandfobs:

Wedding ensemble, 1780

From the Chertsey Museum via Vogue Paris


(via fripperiesandfobs)
heytoyourmamanem:

Slave Advertisement, Charleston, South Carolina, 1780s

Image Source: Library of Congress

heytoyourmamanem:

Slave Advertisement, Charleston, South Carolina, 1780s

Image Source: Library of Congress


(via heytoyourmamanem)
weirdvintage:

A young woman goes sledding at Buxton in the English Peak District, 1904 (from Getty Images’ book "Decades of the 20th Century—1900s" by Nick Yapp, scanned by WeirdVintage)

weirdvintage:

A young woman goes sledding at Buxton in the English Peak District, 1904 (from Getty Images’ book "Decades of the 20th Century—1900s" by Nick Yapp, scanned by WeirdVintage)


(via weirdvintage)
weirdvintage:

Swans are removed from a stretch of the River Thames near Henley to make way for the annual regatta, June 1900.  (from Getty Images’ book "Decades of the 20th Century—1900s" by Nick Yapp, scanned by WeirdVintage)

weirdvintage:

Swans are removed from a stretch of the River Thames near Henley to make way for the annual regatta, June 1900.  (from Getty Images’ book "Decades of the 20th Century—1900s" by Nick Yapp, scanned by WeirdVintage)


(via weirdvintage)
lauramcphee:


Louisa Tounsia, 1948



Despite being one of the most renowned vocalists in Tunisia during the mid-20th century, very little has been written about the great Louisa Tounsia. She was part of the deep tradition of Jewish singers of the Maghreb, along with Raoul Journo and Cheikh El-Afrit, among others.  Her first sessions appear to have been for the French Polyphon label in 1938. She made a few sides for Columbia afterwards, and then recorded at least 25 songs for HMV starting in the mid-1940s.

lauramcphee:

Louisa Tounsia, 1948

Despite being one of the most renowned vocalists in Tunisia during the mid-20th century, very little has been written about the great Louisa Tounsia. She was part of the deep tradition of Jewish singers of the Maghreb, along with Raoul Journo and Cheikh El-Afrit, among others.  Her first sessions appear to have been for the French Polyphon label in 1938. She made a few sides for Columbia afterwards, and then recorded at least 25 songs for HMV starting in the mid-1940s.


(via nostalgerie)
nostalgerie:

Bride and mother in Djerba, Tunisia 1983. Keren Tziona Friedman, Magnes Museum.

nostalgerie:

Bride and mother in Djerba, Tunisia 1983. Keren Tziona Friedman, Magnes Museum.


(via paperminty)

Claire’s fancy-pants HISTORICAL FASHION MASTER POST

shoomlah:

image

So my historical costuming resources list from 2011 was less than a page long- I’m not saying that I’ve learned a lot in the past three years, but this list is now sitting pretty at a solid nine pages.  Whew.  And people wonder why I want to redo this damn series.

This list is by no means an exhaustive one- it’s a list of (primarily western) historical fashion resources, both online and offline, that is limited to what I know, own, or use!  It’s a work in progress, and I’m definitely hoping to expand on it as my knowledge base grows.  First things first, how about a little:

ADVICE FOR RESEARCHING HISTORICAL FASHION

  • Read, and read about more than just costuming.  Allowing yourself to understand the cultural and historical context surrounding the clothing of a particular region/period can be invaluable in sussing out good costume design.  Looking at pictures is all well and good, but reading about societal pressures, about construction techniques, daily routines, local symbolism, whatever else will really help you understand the rhyme and reason behind costuming from any given context.
  • Expand your costume vocabulary.  When you’re delving into a new topic, costuming or otherwise, picking up new terminology is essential to proper understanding and furthering your research.  Write down or take note of terms as you come across them- google them, look up synonyms, and use those words as a jumping off point for more research.  What’s a wire rebato?  How does it differ from a supportasse?  Inquiring minds want to know.
  • Double-check your sources.  Especially on the internet, and double especially on tumblr.  I love it, but it’s ground zero for rapidly spreading misinformation.  Books are usually your safest bet, but also take into account their date of publication, who’s writing them- an author’s biases can severely mangle their original source material.
  • Don’t be afraid to ask for help.  Do everything you can to find out information on your own, but feel free to reach out to people with more specialized areas of knowledge for help!  Be considerate about it- the people you’re asking are busy as well- but a specific line of questioning that proves you’re passionate and that you respect their subject matter expertise can work wonders.

Okay, onto the links!

image

It’s impossible to overstate the importance of getting off the internet and looking into books!  God bless the internet, but books are (generally, this isn’t a rule) better-researched and better-sourced.  Bibliographies also mean each individual books can be a jumping off point for further research, which is always a fantastic thing.

Remember- owning books is awesome and you should absolutely assemble your own library of resources, but LIBRARIES.  Libraries.  You’ll be surprised to find what books are available to you at your local library.

GENERAL / SURVEYS

Patterns fo Fashion books
Detailed, hand-drawn diagrams of historical fashion, inside and out.  Pretty amazing stuff.

Fashion in Detail books
Not what you want if you’re looking for photos of entire costumes- note the “in detail” bit up there.  Just a beautiful series, and great reference for all the little things you might miss otherwise.  The V&A has an amazing fashion collection, and it’s great to see them share it with the world.

image

Read More


(via shoomlah)
newyorker:

As the 2014 Olympics officially open in Sochi, take a look back at photos from the 1980 Summer Games, in Moscow: http://nyr.kr/1b9F7vo
Above: Soviet dancers and gymnasts rehearse for the opening ceremony of the twenty-second Olympic Summer Games, at Moscow’s Lenin Stadium. The Games officially opened on July 19, 1980. Photograph by AP.

newyorker:

As the 2014 Olympics officially open in Sochi, take a look back at photos from the 1980 Summer Games, in Moscow: http://nyr.kr/1b9F7vo

Above: Soviet dancers and gymnasts rehearse for the opening ceremony of the twenty-second Olympic Summer Games, at Moscow’s Lenin Stadium. The Games officially opened on July 19, 1980. Photograph by AP.

(Source: newyorker.com)


(via smithsonianmag)
(via ‘Capa in Color’ at International Center of Photography - NYTimes.com)
From a New York Times article about a new exhibition of photographer Robert Capa’s experiments with color. The above picture is from Capa’s last assignment, covering the French Indochina War for Life Magazine. While working on this project in Vietnam in May 1954, he stepped on a landmine and died.

(via ‘Capa in Color’ at International Center of Photography - NYTimes.com)

From a New York Times article about a new exhibition of photographer Robert Capa’s experiments with color. The above picture is from Capa’s last assignment, covering the French Indochina War for Life Magazine. While working on this project in Vietnam in May 1954, he stepped on a landmine and died.

lauramcphee:

Romania, 1939 (Costica Acsinte)

A Romanian WWI photographer’s 5000 unseen glass plate portraits — beautifully surreal and rapidly deteriorating — are  being digitized 30 years after his death. — Read more on LightBox  (via timelightbox)

lauramcphee:

Romania, 1939 (Costica Acsinte)

A Romanian WWI photographer’s 5000 unseen glass plate portraits — beautifully surreal and rapidly deteriorating — are  being digitized 30 years after his death. — Read more on LightBox  (via timelightbox)


(via lauramcphee)

(via )

artemis2apollo:

A Victorian Lady’s finishing touch—the chatelaine. (From Wikipedia)

A chatelaine is a decorative belt hook or clasp worn at the waist with a series of chains suspended from it. Each chain is mounted with a useful household appendage such as scissors, thimble, watch, key, vinaigrette, household seal, etc.
Chatelaines were worn by many housekeepers in the 19th century and in the 16th century Dutch Republic,where they were typically used as watch chains for the most wealthy. Similar jewellery was also worn by Anglo Saxon women, as seen from the burial record, but its function is uncertain. The name chatelaine derives from the French term châtelaine